Conservation and Research of Felids in Wild


In Situ Felid Conservation Projects – Africa

View a complete list of In Situ Felid Conservation Projects – Africa 2013 supported by Felid TAG and its member institutions.

Featured project – Black-footed Cat Working Group

Dr. Herrick collects samples from a male black-footed cat (Photo: Black-footed Cat Working Group)

Dr. Herrick collects samples from a male black-footed cat (Photo: Black-footed Cat Working Group)

Since 2004, a group of scientists and veterinarians working together as the Black-Footed Cat Working Group (BFCWG) have been studying black-footed cats in South Africa. The BFCWG aims to conserve this rare cat species by furthering awareness and conducting multidisciplinary research on the species’ biology, distribution, ecology, health, and reproduction over an extended period.

 

 

 

Featured Project – Cheetah Conservation Botswana

Cheetah (Photo: Mike Dulaney)

Cheetah (Photo: Mike Dulaney)

Cheetah Conservation Botswana aims to preserve the nation’s cheetah population through scientific research, community outreach and education, working with rural communities to promote coexistence with Botswana’s rich diversity of predator species. The project was formed in 2003 to address the threat to the nation’s cheetah population. The major challenge for the project is one of improving community perceptions towards predators and ensuring that retaliatory killings do not continue to threaten cheetah numbers, while supporting and protecting rural community welfare.

 

In Situ Felid Conservation Projects – Asia

View a complete list of In Situ Felid Conservation Projects – Asia 2013 supported by Felid TAG and its member institutions.

Featured Project – Tiger Conservation Campaign: Amur Tiger

Amur tiger (Photo: Appaloosa)

Amur tiger (Photo: Appaloosa)

The Tiger Species Survival Plan (SSP) created the Tiger Conservation Campaign, to highlight conservation projects for each of the three subspecies of tiger bred in AZA zoos (Amur tiger, Malayan tiger and Sumatran tiger). Funds are distributed to the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), which organizes these conservation projects. In the Russian Far East, the campaign supports the Wildlife Conservation Society’s efforts to curb poaching using more effective patrolling and monitoring techniques. It also supports training opportunities for Russian veterinarians and research efforts to understand the source of the canine distemper virus that threatened Amur tigers.

Featured Project – Snow Leopard Trust

Snow leopard

Snow leopard

Founded in 1981, the Snow Leopard Trust is the world’s leading authority on the study and protection of the endangered snow leopard. The Snow Leopard Trust builds community partnerships by using sound science to determine priorities for protecting the endangered snow leopard. With programs and staff in five snow leopard range countries, and connections with researchers and conservation organizations around the world, the Snow Leopard Trust is a leader in the effort to secure the future of the snow leopard.

 

 

In Situ Felid Conservation Projects – Americas

View a complete list of In Situ Felid Conservation Projects – North America 2013 and In Situ Felid Conservation Projects – Central & South America 2013 supported by Felid TAG and its member institutions.

Featured Project – Wild Cats of Tamaulipas Binational Conservation Program

Ocelot captured on camera (Photo: Wild Cats of Tamaulipas)

Ocelot captured on camera (Photo: Wild Cats of Tamaulipas)

In 2012, local non-profit organization Conservación y Desarrollo de Espacios Naturales (CDEN) conducted a monitoring study commissioned by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, using motion-sensitive cameras financed by the Friends of Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge to determine the status of the ocelot in Tamaulipas, Mexico. One of the most exciting results was a visual record of an amazing variety of wildlife in the area, with images of over 20 mammal species, including five wild cat species: jaguars, pumas, ocelots, jaguarundis and bobcats. The Wild Cats of Tamaulipas Binational Conservation Program was created following the initial study to continue to monitor wild cats in the area and work with the local community and government to conserve them.

Featured Project – Saving the Florida Panther

Florida panther release back into the wild (Photo: Tim Donovan)

Florida panther release back into the wild (Photo: Tim Donovan)

In partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Florida Wildlife Conservation Commission, White Oak Conservation Center and other AZA institutions work to rehabilitate and release injured and orphaned Florida panthers back into the wild. Vehicle collisions are one of the top threats to panthers. With 100 to 160 adults remaining in the wild, every individual panther plays a crucial role in the future survival of the population.